MURRAY MCMURRAY HATCHERY HOSTS JAPANESE DELEGATES CONDUCTING WORLDWIDE CAMPAIGN TO TRACE DNA HISTORY OF DOMESTIC CHICKENS

Japanese researchers embarked on a multi-country journey with a visit to Murray McMurray Hatchery in Webster City, Iowa as part of a study to trace the DNA of domestic chickens. During the five-day visit, the researchers collected blood samples from more than 20 breeds of chickens offered by Murray McMurray Hatchery. 

“To be chosen as a designation by the team of researchers speaks volumes about the birds we offer,” said Bud Wood, President of Murray McMurray Hatchery.  “This was actually their second visit to our flock farms and we are absolutely thrilled to assist them with their interests.”  Murray McMurray Hatchery members Bud Wood and Chris Huseman, Ph.D., Director of Marketing assisted with the collection process.  “The more information we can collectively share through research efforts to learn about the historical development of the breeds we offer is a win-win solution,” added Dr. Huseman. “Through our efforts inspired by our mutual interests, we will better understand these beautiful creatures.”

 The Japanese research team visiting Iowa consisted of Dr. Yoshio Yamamoto, Dr. Takeshi Sasaki, Dr. Takahiro Yonezawa and Mr. Ichiro Fukunaga.  The entire research team is comprised of 15 people total, with various members traveling to Webster City, Iowa in the United States, Southeast Asia, United Kingdom, Holland and Hungary later this year.    Iowa State University assisted with the extraction of the DNA from the blood samples collected.

Since 1917, Murray McMurray Hatchery has been the leader in supplying the small farmer, rural egg producer and chicken enthusiast with a wide variety of day-old baby chicks, pullets, ducklings and much more.  The hatchery offers more than 150 varieties of birds.

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3 Responses to MURRAY MCMURRAY HATCHERY HOSTS JAPANESE DELEGATES CONDUCTING WORLDWIDE CAMPAIGN TO TRACE DNA HISTORY OF DOMESTIC CHICKENS

  1. Tom Bridgman says:

    Okay, I only ordered 1 rooster and ended up with four. I chose the Jersey Black Gaint for my rooster due the breed being ranked as especially docile. Well, I just got attacked our largest rooster. Is this a normal behaviior for this breed’s roosters? I have been around chickens all my life and know that roosters get stupid in the spring, but it is August now shouldn’t they be calming down? Oh Hens are just starting to lay, getting 3-5 eggs a day from a flock of 24 hens.

  2. Mary Walsh says:

    My Grandson just went to fair and he did well for his first year. We brought a White Rock hen and she was in the egg production class. She placed 10th. Now the judge said that in this class she just looks at the vent. Please tell me what to look for in a vent? I really was looking for some of the wrong things. I thought a comb without frostbite, straight legs and no problem toes, four fingers wide across back area, no missing feathers on the head from other hens, but I did not know how to help him pick a good hen. We are pleased to have placed 10th and we had a fun year so we are not disappointed however I’m not sure what to look for. Please help explain what makes a good vent. Is it size? Is it color? Do I keep track of hen that has the largest eggs?

  3. Laura Lazzarotto says:

    I would be very interested in reading about the DNA findings!

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